Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby Tigerdaisy » Tue May 08, 2018 10:41 am

I've also found ptfe tape to last a long time on Strat term arms. I believe the man himself also used to use this solution at one time.
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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby dave robinson » Tue May 08, 2018 6:29 pm

I had until recently a Brian May guitar, one of the ones that he is overseeing and I can say it's a terrifc instrument, in as much I may get snother - see what I inadvertanly did there ?
The point is the trem, on this guitar it is the Strat style arm and trem system that has an arm similar shaped to the easymute, but better. It's one of the best I have ever used and Brian had this 'cranked' shape arm over forty years ago and it's also very much aesthetically more pleasing on the eye than the other one. :)
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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby Uncle Fiesta » Thu May 10, 2018 12:19 pm

dave robinson wrote: ... These 'Staytrem' and 'Easymute' things probably do a job OK and are here, even though they don't need to be, there's always someone who'll buy them. ;)


Well if can manage with the standard trem, I'm sure anybody can!!
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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby Stuart » Fri May 11, 2018 10:42 am

You guys should not be so dismissive of refinements available for guitars until you have tried and compared them.The staytrem is simply a trem arm that fits as a direct replacement for the strat arm but because it fastens firmly into the trem block and has a proper swivel joint on the arm it gives 3 distinct improvements.
1 There is absolutely no clonkiness or looseness when using the arm .
2 The rotational friction is variable to suit the player by a simple fingers only turn on the adjuster.
3The arm angle/height is adjustable without having to readjust tension springs and reset saddle heights etc.
And it is not an expensive product.
. I have had my strat for 52 years now and have grown tired of ptfe tape bodging which incidentally only lasts for about 30 minutes playing time and is unsatisfactory as it restricts rotation when it is fresh and then soon becomes sloppy again.
Why are you guys so against it? I have been using one on my strat for the last 3 years about 1500 hours of playing time and it is problem free.
To dismiss every new development is very close minded thinking and if everyone thought on this way the strat itself would never have come into being. After all, who needs 3 pickups? There are 3 on my tele.Who nrefs individually adjusting height and intonation bridge saddles ? Who needs all the machine heads in line pn the yop side of the headstock?Who needs a contoured body shape?
Do you see my point All these things may be unnecessary but they make the instrument better, more comfortable,easier to use and play .
I do not support every whimsical product thatt comes along but when something simple effectively improves sn already great instrument, it deserves merit
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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby Tab » Fri May 11, 2018 2:47 pm

I think you misunderstand.

Most of the comments are not dismissive of the refinements - we are just happy with the original trem system.
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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby noelford » Sat May 12, 2018 9:27 am

Indeed. The trem on my Strat is problem free already, with no modifications whatsoever. I have nothing against innovation which improves playability, but I simply don't need to improve the playability of my Strat, mainly because of the excellent set-up my guitar tech did for me, quite a few years ago, now.
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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby anniv 63 » Sat May 12, 2018 2:57 pm

At least the Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar, BassV1 and Jazzmaster have
fairly decent trem arms that push in, dont wobble and swivel ok

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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby dave robinson » Sat May 12, 2018 5:22 pm

Stuart wrote:You guys should not be so dismissive of refinements available for guitars until you have tried and compared them.The staytrem is simply a trem arm that fits as a direct replacement for the strat arm but because it fastens firmly into the trem block and has a proper swivel joint on the arm it gives 3 distinct improvements.
1 There is absolutely no clonkiness or looseness when using the arm .
2 The rotational friction is variable to suit the player by a simple fingers only turn on the adjuster.
3The arm angle/height is adjustable without having to readjust tension springs and reset saddle heights etc.
And it is not an expensive product.
. I have had my strat for 52 years now and have grown tired of ptfe tape bodging which incidentally only lasts for about 30 minutes playing time and is unsatisfactory as it restricts rotation when it is fresh and then soon becomes sloppy again.
Why are you guys so against it? I have been using one on my strat for the last 3 years about 1500 hours of playing time and it is problem free.
To dismiss every new development is very close minded thinking and if everyone thought on this way the strat itself would never have come into being. After all, who needs 3 pickups? There are 3 on my tele.Who nrefs individually adjusting height and intonation bridge saddles ? Who needs all the machine heads in line pn the yop side of the headstock?Who needs a contoured body shape?
Do you see my point All these things may be unnecessary but they make the instrument better, more comfortable,easier to use and play .
I do not support every whimsical product thatt comes along but when something simple effectively improves sn already great instrument, it deserves merit


I have seen and tried the Staytrem system and didn't like it makes the bridge look ugly, very much like a bodge job, whilst my own Strat trems work trouble free and look neat and tidy.
I also was unfortunate enough to acquire the Easymute system on an American DeLuxe Strat, which I immediately removed and replaced it with the original, which is a 'pop in' type arm. I added the plastic tip to make it look right.
That said, with fifty odd years professionsl experience playing Strats', I feel qualified to argue the point.
I agree that the 'clunking ' arm is unacceptable, but it seems that many of us don't have the problem.
If the Straytrem works for you, fine, but have respect for the majority who have told you that it's in the set up and whom make a good living using the existing Fender arm.
We could be excused for thinking that you were trying to promote this product.
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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby Stuart » Sat May 12, 2018 6:33 pm

Dave, I can assure you that I have no connection with staytrem and no interest on promoting any of their products. I simply wanted to bring it to members attention that there is a clunk free trem arm which also can stay wherever you leave it and is easily height adjustable.On all of these points it outperforms the original fender arm. The guitar setup will not make any difference to these points .
I am not in any way suggesting that anyone who is satisfied with their guitar should change anything. An instrument is a very personal thing and should be tailored to suit the owner. We all strive to improve the playability of our instruments.
You will be pleased to hear that I am off my soapbox now and will not post any more on the subject.☺☺
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Re: Is the Electric Guitar 'dead'?

Postby Iain Purdon » Sat May 12, 2018 7:19 pm

Interesting, though, that the EasyMute system is endorsed by Hank Marvin, they claim in their literature. Does that endorsement account for the body of opinion that thinks it’s a good thing?
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